History in Print

Filtering by: History in Print

History in Print featuring 'Victor Lundy: Artist Architect'
Apr
16
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Victor Lundy: Artist Architect'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

If you're looking for something new under the midcentury sun, Victor Lundy is a real find — an important yet underappreciated figure in the history of American architecture. Trained in both the Beaux Arts and Bauhaus traditions, he built an impressive practice ranging from small-scale residential and commercial buildings to expressive religious buildings and two preeminent institutional works: the U.S. Tax Court Building in Washington, D.C. (now on the National Register of Historic Places), and the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka.

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History in Print featuring 'Lost, Texas'
Sep
11
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Lost, Texas'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In Lost, Texas: Photographs of Forgotten Buildings, architect and architectural photographer Bronson Dorsey takes us on a tour of abandoned buildings in Texas that evoke the mystique of bygone days and shifting population patterns. With a skilled photographer’s eye, he captures the character of these buildings — most abandoned and in a state of decay, though a handful have been repurposed as museums, residences or other functional structures.

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History in Print featuring 'Power Moves'
Mar
20
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Power Moves'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In 1950, Greater Houston had just one freeway: the Gulf Freeway, the first sections of which were built immediately after World War II. Since then, more than 1,200 miles of freeways have been built in Houston and Harris County, and additional freeways are under construction. Highways have driven nearly every aspect of Houston’s postwar development, from the physical layout of the city to the political process that has transformed both the transportation network and the balance of power between the government and citizens.

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History in Print featuring 'Constructing Houston's Future'
Jan
25
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Constructing Houston's Future'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Houston architect Arthur Jones helped to design some of the city's most familiar buildings and developments, including the Astrodome, Greenway Plaza, Allen Center and Rice Stadium. Despite Jones' prolific career with the firm Lloyd Morgan Jones, his designs are often overshadowed by the big-name national architects who worked during the Bayou City's postwar boom.

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History in Print featuring ‘Architecture That Speaks’
Nov
28
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring ‘Architecture That Speaks’

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Between 1928 and 1933, the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas — later Texas A&M University — saw its campus transformed through the construction of 10 remarkable buildings developed under a master plan by college architect Frederick Giesecke and designed by Samuel Charles Phelps Vosper. The buildings, all of which survive, still delight the senses with color, sculpture and wit.

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History in Print featuring 'DFW Deco'
Oct
10
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'DFW Deco'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Texas isn't known for its Art Deco design, but the Lone Star State has more than its share — particularly in North Texas, where cotton, cattle and oil combined to create a rich variety of modernistic buildings, artwork and monuments in the 1920s, '30s and '40s. Preservation Houston's David Bush and Jim Parsons explore the region's Deco treasures in DFW Deco: Modernistic Architecture of North Texas, the pair's fourth book chronicling Art Deco in the Lone Star State.

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History in Print featuring 'Pleasant Bend'
Aug
8
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Pleasant Bend'

  • Proler Chapel, Congregation Emanu El (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

On Tuesday, August 8, hear stories of Harris County's pioneer beginnings when Dan Worrall, the author of Pleasant Bend: Upper Buffalo Bayou and the San Felipe Trail in the Nineteenth Century, explains how a sluggish body of water and a rugged trail stirred an economic engine. Roughly following the route of today's San Felipe Road, the trail carried cotton from plantations along the Brazos and Colorado rivers across seemingly endless tallgrass prairie to Houston's port on Buffalo Bayou for shipment to the wider world. After Emancipation, African American families from those same plantations made their way east on the San Felipe Trail to begin new lives in Houston's Freedmen's Town.

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History in Print featuring 'Material Culture of German Texans'
Dec
13
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'Material Culture of German Texans'

  • First Unitarian Universalist Church (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From the days of the Republic, German immigrants left a distinctive mark on the architecture and lifeways of Texas that is still evident today. In his award-winning book, Kenneth Hafertepe shares a decade of research examining how German culture was adapted to everyday life in rural, small-town and urban settings from East Texas to the Hill Country.

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History in Print featuring 'The Other Great Migration'
Oct
20
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'The Other Great Migration'

The 20th century saw two great waves of African-American migration from the countryside into the city, changing not only the nation's demographics, but its culture as well. Join Preservation Houston on Thursday evening, October 20, as author and historian Bernadette Pruitt tells the story of The Other Great Migration as part of Preservation Houston's History in Print author series.

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History in Print featuring 'BIG Little House'
Jul
12
6:30 PM18:30

History in Print featuring 'BIG Little House'

As Houston experiences increasingly dense development and rising housing costs, could the future of our neighborhoods include a step back to small houses?

During her presentation, author Donna Kacmar will demonstrate that small dwellings (under 1,000 square feet) are not just down-sized versions of big houses. Thoughtfully designed small houses can be integrated into their surroundings and reflect the priorities of the people who live in them. Using exceptional examples from around the country, Kacmar will offer insights for anyone interested in small-scale projects and illustrate how building small can be a deliberate design strategy in its own right.

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